Posts Tagged ‘ Vitamix Pro 300 ’

Collection of Vitamix 5 star recipes

At the request of a family member who called me asking about my hiyashi-chuuka sauce recipe, saying they couldn’t find it on this blog, I’ve put together a collection of all the 5-star recipes I’ve posted to date:

Dips and Sauces
Hummus
(video)
Hiyashi-chuuka (冷やし中華) sauce
Yogurt Herb Sauce

Drinks
The Best Tasting Banana Milk (half soy milk, half milk, I also really like adding roasted soybeans to banana milks made with just milk (video))
Hot Chocolate

Frozen Piña Coladas
Homemade Frozen Mocha Frappuccino

Sorbets and Italian Ices
Fresh Peaches Sorbet
Homemade Grown-up Polar Cup

Other
Homemade Peanut Butter (video)
Kinako Powder
Acorn Squash Soup

There’s plenty of stuff I rated four stars that I still make pretty regularly, but this is a pretty good representation of most of my favorite uses for my Vitamix blender.

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Fresh Peaches and Pineapple Sorbet (★★★★☆)

As I mentioned at the end of a recent post, I decided to try frozen peaches with canned pineapple.  The idea was to recreate/tweak the awesome flavor of Fresh Peaches Sorbet without needing any honey or sugar, and pineapple seemed like a great complement.

It is absolutely fantastic, and the only reason I’m not giving it five stars is because my parents felt that the pineapple flavor almost overpowered the peach flavor, and that they enjoyed the Fresh Peaches Sorbet because the peaches were the star.

Fresh Peaches and Pineapple Sorbet (★★★★☆)
Fantastic frozen dessert when peaches are in season so you can pick up naturally very sweet peaches at a reasonable price.  Well suited for utility peaches.  Serves approximately 4-8 people, depending on serving size.

10-12 frozen peaches (cut and pits removed)
1 can of pineapple chunks
Ice

Freeze the peaches in advance.  Then put the peaches and pineapple in the blender.  Blend on medium to high, using the tamper and adjusting the blender intensity to ensure everything is well mixed.  Add ice and/or water to dilute the mix to the desired strength and consistency.  Add honey or sugar for additional sweetness.  Serve immediately.

Again, the magic ingredient is the ripe, local, seasonal peaches, which are so good they don’t need much help.  I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t be the same with lower quality peaches.

My parents tell me they were able to make a phenomenal sorbet using fresh peaches and red grapes in the 5200 I gave them.   I still have enough frozen peaches remaining for a small batch, so maybe I’ll pick up some red grapes and try that.  (Update:  Used the last of my peaches with red grapes.  Also very good, but I think I personally preferred the pineapple.)

Fresh Blackberry Sorbet (★★☆☆☆)

Our backyard has a fence that’s lined with blackberry and raspberry bushes on the other side of it.  The blackberries are at their peak and we we’re bringing in about a pound a day this week.

Based on how good the Fresh Peaches Sorbet was, we decided to try to recreate that magic with fresh blackberries.  Unfortunately, the blackberries are smaller than what you’d see at the grocery store, and have a substantial number of seeds per berry.  Despite blending them for a reasonable length of time, the gritty, sand-like seeds in the sorbet meant the excellent flavor was ruined by the unfortunate texture.

Fresh Blackberry Sorbet (★★☆☆☆)
Might work better with large, juicy farm berries, but still not something I’d recommend based on the gritty texture added by the berry seeds.

1 lbs. of blackberries (half frozen, half refrigerated)
Raw honey (approximately 3-4 tablespoons)
Ice

Freeze half the blackberries in advance.  Then put the blackberries and two cups of ice in the blender.  Blend on medium to high, using the tamper and adjusting the blender intensity to ensure everything is well mixed.  Add approximately three tablespoons of honey and taste.  Sorbet can be sweetened with additional honey or diluted with additional ice.  Serve immediately.

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It looked good and had nice flavor, but it’s not something I’ll be making again.   Neither this nor the berry juice I made last year seem to be great uses of the berries.  Maybe I’ll come up with a great recipe involving the berries and Vitamix next summer.

Fresh Peaches Sorbet (★★★★★)

We visited a local farmers market in Troy and picked up 4 quarts of delicious utility peaches (essentially a box full of peaches with split pits) for $10.  My old 5200’s Whole Food Recipes Vitamix cookbook had a Peach Sorbet recipe, but it called for ¾ cup of sugar and only 3 peaches, which is roughly 600 calories of sugar, and seemed like a crazy ratio of peaches to sugar.  It also called for 4 cups of ice, which seemed excessive.

We’d also bought some local raw honey, and I figured the peaches were sweet enough that I wouldn’t need to use much to sweeten the peaches, so I cut up a lot of peaches, roughly a dozen, and froze half of it.  I threw this recipe together on a lark, assuming I could add more honey and ice after blending the peaches, but it went over so well with all six people I served it to that it didn’t need tweaking and I thought it’d be worth sharing.

Fresh Peaches Sorbet (★★★★★)
Fantastic frozen dessert when peaches are in season so you can pick up naturally very sweet peaches at a reasonable price.  Well suited for utility peaches.  Serves approximately 4-8 people, depending on serving size.

12 peaches (cut and pits removed)
Raw honey (approximately 3-4 tablespoons)
Ice

Freeze half the peaches in advance.  Then put the peaches and two cups of ice in the blender.  Blend on medium to high, using the tamper and adjusting the blender intensity to ensure everything is well mixed.  Add approximately three tablespoons of honey and taste.  Sorbet can be sweetened with additional honey or diluted with additional ice.  Serve immediately.

That’s it, the only magic is that ripe, local, seasonal fruit is so good it doesn’t need much help.  The reactions I got were so good that I can’t give this anything less than five stars, but I know it wouldn’t be the same with lower quality peaches.

(Update: Both pineapple and grapes can be used instead of honey)

Avocado Pits and Sweetened Condensed Milk (not together!)

I’d read about people using avocado pits in green smoothies, so when my wife was about to throw away an avocado pit tonight I asked her to keep it so I could blend it and see how bad it was.

I blended it up with some fresh blueberries a few cherries and some shiso leaves from our garden, along with a generous amount of water and ice.  I love shiso, to the point that it represents the majority of our garden at this point in the season, and even enjoy blending shiso leaves with just water and ice, but no amount of shiso or fruit was going to make that avocado pit taste good enough to make it worth drinking, even it is filled with antioxidants, potassium and fiber.  It was way too bitter and unpleasant for me to try using again any time soon.

My other recent experiment, which worked out much better, was putting sweetened condensed milk and caramel sauce on top of blended coffee ice cubes.  That turned a quirky summer bowl of (literally) ice coffee into a tasty treat, and I’ve updated that recipe to encourage anyone who tries blending coffee ice cubes to put sweetened condensed milk on top.

Iced Coffee Polar Cup / Shave Ice (★★☆☆☆)

In the summer, we keep our thermostat pretty high, and frozen treats taste that much better as a result.  In fact, when I come in on a hot day, pretty much anything frozen is a treat.

That’s basically way I keep putting coffee, mostly decaf, in ice trays and blending them in the Vitamix 7500.  The 7500 basically turns them into coffee ice dust, and the blender container has enough surface area that an entire tray ends up as powder without any chunks or slush left to circulate in the blades.

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I don’t bother adding anything else, I just consider it a different way to have a black ice coffee on a hot day.  Surprisingly, both my kids occasionally help me eat them as well, despite the flavor being just black coffee.  I wouldn’t be all that surprised if I’m the only one who likes it as much as I do, which is why I’ve rated it so low, but I’ve already made this a dozen times this summer, and it’s really grown on me.

It probably doesn’t need to be spelled out as a recipe, but on the off chance that it might help someone, here goes:

Iced Coffee Snowcones / Shave Ice (★★☆☆☆)
As with fruit bars, you need a stronger flavor in the frozen treat than you do in the liquid drink.  When I’m making a pot of coffee, I’ll add a little bit coffee more than I normally would, and as soon as there’s enough coffee to fill two ice trays, I’ll fill the trays and put them in the fridge.

1 tray of coffee ice cubes

Throw the whole tray in the blender and start it at 10.  Let it spin until basically nothing is making contact with the blades, which won’t take long, then turn the blender off.  (If you go past 30 seconds, you’re dealing with a different tray of ice cubes.)  Use a spatula to scoop all the snow from the container and lid into the bowl.  (A reasonable amount will be on the bottom of the lid.) If you’re in a warm room, the snow in each corner will already start clumping together, as you can see in the photo above.

Enjoy!


Edit: Iced Coffee Snowcones / Shave Ice with Sweetened Condensed Milk (★★★★☆)
Want to make this a valid tasty treat that you can serve to others?  Drizzle it with sweetened condensed milk and/or caramel sauce.  I personally prefer just sweetened condensed milk.

Hummus (★★★★★) using the Vitamix 7500 (with video)

My original post of this hummus recipe is hidden in between two other recipes in a post back in 2011, and since it’s the most requested dish I make, I think it deserves a post of it’s own and a video showing how easy it is to make.

Hummus (★★★★★)
2 Cans of Chick Peas/Garbanzos (15.5 oz), one strained, one with all the water from the can
¼ cup of raw sesame seeds
1 tablespoon olive oil
¼ cup of lemon juice
1 large garlic clove, peeled
1 teaspoon cumin
a pinch of sea salt

Put everything in and blend on high with the tamper for about 30 seconds or until everything’s well blended.  Chill if not serving immediately.

As I mention in the video, unless it’s a particularly large garlic clove, I tend to use two or three smaller cloves, but I’m a big fan of garlic, so adjust to match your tastes.

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