Posts Tagged ‘ soup ’

Broccoli Cheese Soup (★★★☆☆) using the Vitamix 7500 (with video)

After my last post I decided to make a soup that I’ve made a few times in the past.  It’s very easy, pretty good, but not popular with my kids, which is why I can only give it three stars and why I haven’t posted about it in the past.  This time around I decided to make a video showing how easy it is to make.

Broccoli Cheese Soup (★★★☆☆)
2 cups (480 ml) whole milk
2/3 cup (80 g) shredded cheese
1 bag (12 oz /340 g) of frozen broccoli florets
2 teaspoons worth of onion
2 teaspoons of cornstarch
1 large chicken bouillon cube

Steam or microwave the frozen broccoli florets.  While doing that, prepare the correct amounts of the other ingredients.  Put two-thirds of the broccoli in the blender along with all of the other ingredients.  Blend on high with the tamper for about 5-6 seconds or until steam is coming out of the top of the blender.  Once the soup is done blending, pour into bowls and garnish the bowls with the remaining steamed florets and shredded cheese. 

This recipe is twice the size of the Vitamix Whole Food Recipes recipe that I based it on, and can easily be cut in half if making it for one or two people.

a serving of soup after adding florets and shredded cheese

Here’s a serving of soup after adding florets and shredded cheese

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I’m tired of it being cold out! Does anyone have any good soup recipes?

It’s February in upstate New York, and we just got a lot of snow today.  I’ve spent most of my life in parts of the world where snow is a rarity, and snow sticking around is even more rare, so neither my wife nor I are particularly well suited for handling upstate New York winters.

If you look through my post history, it’s not a secret that I am a fan of frozen drinks.  Everyone of those words is a link to a different post I made that has a recipe with frozen in the title of the post, and that list would significantly longer if smoothies were added.  I even made a post called Frozen Summer Drink Recommendations last summer.

Now, I like soups, just not as much as frozen drinks.  I’ve written multiple times about a few different soups, but aside from squash based soups I haven’t stumbled across many Vitamix
or Blendtec soup recipes that excite me.  Am I missing out on some ridiculously awesome soups that you guys are familiar with that would make winters more enjoyable?  Please let me know in the comments if you have any highly recommended soup recipes!

Butternut Squash Soup (★★★★★)

I decided to wrap up what will probably be my busiest day of blender usage in 2014 with homemade soup for dinner.  I’ve made Acorn Squash Soup enough times over the last three years that I know how I like it, and I know what to expect, so when I asked my wife to pick up the ingredients we’d need for Acorn Squash soup, I was surprised when she came back with butternut squash instead.  She picked up butternut squash saying she thought it’d be interesting, and I’m glad she did.

I’d actually never prepared butternut squash before, so I found a great guide that helped me figure out how to prepare both the squash and the seeds.  I roasted the butternut squash as cubes, which gave me plenty of time to boil and then roast the seeds, which turned out much better than I expected.

This was going to be dinner for my family of four, so instead of making a double sized batch of soup, as I’ve done in the past, I decided it’d be interesting to make on batch in my new Blendtec Designer Series blender, and another in my Vitamix Professional Series 300. (The Pro 300 is basically the same as a 7500, a good explanation of the different models is here.)

Regarding the recipe, over the years, my soup recipe has gradually evolved from the original Acorn Squash Soup recipe into what I make today, and I recognize that my current version is based on my personal preferences, but if you’re a fan of richer soups and squash, I think you’ll really like this.

Butternut Squash Soup (★★★)
This recipe can be doubled, which allows you to use an entire squash when making it.  It works very well with Acorn Squash as well, and tremendously aided by quality milk, so for the best possible soup, make this with fresh, in-season squash and local farm milk.

1/2 butternut squash
1 large bouillion cubes (2 cups of broth worth of bouillon cubes)
2 cups of whole milk
1 teaspoons of maple syrup
pinch of nutmeg (to taste)
cinnamon stick pieces (to taste)
pinch of extra virgin, first cold pressed olive oil
a sliver of fresh ginger
salt (to taste)
pepper (to taste)

I prepared the butternut squash by cubing and roasting it, using the guide I linked to above.  I roasted the cubes for somewhere between 30 and 40 minutes at 400, during which time I was able to boil and then roast the squash seeds, and then prepare the blender with the rest of the ingredients above.

With everything else in the blender and ready for the squash, I take the hot squash cubes straight out of the oven and put them into the blender.  For the Blendtec Designer Series, I use the 90 second soup cycle, and for the Vitamix, I blend on 10 with the tamper for that same 90 seconds, both of which should be sufficient.

Taste.  Add nutmeg, ginger and cinnamon to taste and blend.  Then add salt and pepper to taste and blend.  May need to be heated further in a pot before serving.

One of the things I was very interested in as I made this was how the two blenders would handle the same soup.  I tried to set things up to be as equal as possible:

Preparing both blenders for Butternut Squash Soup

Preparing both blenders for Butternut Squash Soup

Adding equal amount of squash to both mixes

Adding equal amount of squash to both mixes

Blending the soup in both the Blendtec Design Series (left) and Vitamix (right)

Blending the soup in both the Blendtec Design Series (left) and Vitamix Pro 300 (right)

When both mixes were complete, I asked my wife to try them both.  She said the Vitamix tasted more fluffy, but I noticed that the Blendtec soup tasted warmer.  Wanting to warm the soup up just a tad more before serving, I decided to add the Vitamix batch to the Blendtec, which I didn’t anticipate to be a problem, because that’s how much I normally make in the Vitamix when I make squash soup these days.

Running both batches of soup through a second soup cycle in the Blendtec Designer Series

Running both batches of soup through a second soup cycle in the Blendtec Designer Series

Running the Blendtec through a second soup cycle, I began to smell an electric, or motor burning smell.  The Blendtec completed it’s entire cycle, but odor that was given off makes me think that the large amount of soup coupled with running the soup cycle twice in a short period of time (it’s the longest and highest speed of any of the presets) was taxing the Blendtec a bit more than I’d be comfortable to subject it to on a regular basis, based on the odor it was giving off.  It did heat the soup, and between the heat created by the blenders and the heat of the squash, the soup did not need any additional heating before being served.

The soup was delicious, and my wife commented that it has a less distinct flavor than that Acorn Squash Soup, and that it seems like it would appeal to a large group of people as a result.  It was very filling, and the next time I’m looking for a squash for soup, I’ll choose whatever acorn squash or butternut squash is the most in-season, as this recipe works very well with either!

Acorn Squash Soup (★★★★★)

This is my third autumn since we’ve moved to Upstate New York, and our local farms are selling locally grown acorn squash again, so it’s time to start making Acorn Squash Soup, which is my favorite soup to make with my Professional Series 300 Vitamix.  (Yes, it’s basically the same as a Vitamix 7500, a good explanation of the different models is here.)

Now, over the years, I my recipe has gradually evolved from the original version to what I make today, and I recognize that my current version is based on my personal preferences, but if you’re a fan of richer soups and acorn squash, I think you’ll really like this.

Acorn Squash Soup (★★★)
This recipe can easily be halved, and used to be half this size.  I’ve simply gotten in the habit of using an entire squash when making it. The Acorn Squash is the star of the soup, and tremendously aided by quality milk, so the difference between this soup made with sub-standard milk and below average acorn squash and this soup made with fresh, in-season acorn squash and local farm milk is a big one.

1 medium acorn squash
2 large bouillion cubes (2 cups of broth worth of bouillon cubes)
4 cups of whole milk
2 teaspoons of maple syrup
pinch of nutmeg (to taste)
cinnamon stick pieces (to taste)
pinch of extra virgin, first cold pressed olive oil
a sliver of fresh ginger
salt (to taste)
pepper (to taste)

The easy way to cook the squash is to slice it as cleanly in half as possible.  Clean out the seeds, which I like to roast separately, and put both halves in a pyrex tray large enough to hold them, putting just enough water in to prevent air from getting in/out of the squash.  Microwave the squash for approximately 10-15 minutes, depending on how large it is. (May need longer depending on the microwave)

While the squash is being microwaved, put the milk, cinnamon sticks, ginger, nutmeg, maple syrup, extra virgin olive oil and bouillon cubes in the blender, and blend on high for about a minute so that everything is very well blended before adding squash.  You can easily add more cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger as needed, but you can’t take it out, so err on the side of caution if you’re not sure how much to add.  Ginger and cinnamon both help bring out the flavor of acorn squash.  While I personally add a reasonable amount of cinnamon, I haven’t had anyone successfully identify the ginger before being told it’s in there.

Once the squash is done being cooked in the microwave, it should be reasonably easy to turn the squash over and scoop out the meat out, leaving only the skin behind.  If the squash is still tough, it needs to be cooked longer next time.  After putting all the squash meat into the blender, you’re dealing with a pretty full container.  Blend until well mixed and taste.  Add nutmeg, ginger and cinnamon to taste and blend.  Then add salt and pepper to taste and blend.  May need to be heated further in a pot before serving.

My wife and I both love the fluffy, whipped texture the blender gives it, and this newer recipe gives it more milk, more flavor and a slightly higher ratio of squash to liquid than the original recipe.  It may not be quite as light, but if you don’t mind a filling soup and like acorn squash, I think the changes are all for the better.

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